Profiles for Technology

Profiles for Technology Literate Students Grades K-12

Maranacook Area Schools | RSU 38
Serving the towns of Manchester, Readfield, Mount Vernon, and Wayne
Approved June 6, 2006, Updated K-5 on June 3, 2014

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Technology Committee
Introduction
Kindergarten”Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grades 6-8
Grades 9-12
Glossary

Technology Committee

Diane MacGregor, District Technology Director
Mary Ann Florek , Computer Technician Wayne Elementary School, Manchester Elementary School
Linda Gatti-Fyler, Computer Technician Readfield and Mount Vernon Elementary Schools
Brett Trefethen, Technology Integration Specialist K-8
Lori Twiss, Technology Integration Specialist 9-12

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Introduction

The skills outlined in this document are developed over the years by coordinated activities that integrate technology with the curriculum and are not recommended to be taught in isolation. The use of technology should be an integral part of all learning.

This document is based on the grade specific profiles for learning established by the International Society of Technology in Education (ISTE) called the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) for Students. The goal of developing this document was to establish very specific standards that would prepare students for lifelong learning and productive citizenship. Computer technology represents one of the tools students use to achieve this goal.

The standards established by ISTE are divided into six categories:
I.      Creativity and Innovation
II.     Communication and Collaboration
III.    Research and Information Retrieval
IV.     Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving and Decision-Making
V.      Digital Citizenship
VI.     Technology Operations and Concepts

Under each of these categories are the lists of standards that are expected at each grade level. Some of these may have numbered items which represent the instructional strategies or recommended resources for each. If an item is underlined, that would represent a new skill being introduced. Many skills are carried over for a few years so that the student will develop mastery.

The Maine Learning Results (MLR) has little reference to computer technology. Rather, the word technology usually refers to the broader definition of technology as being the human innovation that solve problems. The only references in the MLR to skills involving computer use are in terms such as “make tables or graphs to represent changes”, “gather, analyze, and interpret data”, “use internet resources to research”, and some ethical issues which are addressed under Digital Citizenship in this document.  These references are usually presented as examples of instructional strategies.

Students understand the expectation for daily computer lessons based on the posted learning target.

For more information on resources used to develop this document, visit:
ISTE   http://cnets.iste.org/
21st century skills   http://www.ncrel.org/engauge/skills/skills.htm
Maine Learning Results http://www.maine.gov/education/lres/review/peigr.html

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Profiles for Technology Literate Students:  Kindergarten

I.  Creativity and Innovation
A. Use a paint program to create a drawing and type their name.
•Tux Paint

II.  Communication and Collaboration
A. Work cooperatively and collaboratively with peers, family members, and others when using technology.

III.  Research and Information Retrieval
A. Use developmentally appropriate multimedia resources (e.g., interactive books, websites, educational software, elementary multimedia encyclopedias) to support learning.
B. Use teacher created Portaportal for web resources and access the website found there.

IV.  Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving and Decision-Making
A. Use primary-level websites to reinforce reading, math, problem solving and critical thinking skills.

V.  Digital Citizenship
A. Demonstrate respect for the computer work of others.

VI.  Technology Operations and Concepts
A. Communicate about technology using the following developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology:   keyboard, computer, printer, click, screen, dock, cursor, arrow, touchpad/trackpad, mouse, print, headset, and CD drive.
B. Demonstrate respect for and correct use of computer equipment including headsets (pressing keys gently, no eating/drinking), shared devices and resources. Printing by permission only.
C. Understand the importance of cleanliness around the computer.
Demonstrate appropriate conduct during computer work periods.
E. Use a mouse/trackpad and keyboard.
•Type the alphabet
•Type name
•Introduce shift key
•Click Drag and Drop

VII. Online Assessment
A. NWEA: Explore as a group and practice individually the use of the NWEA interactive demo site.

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Profiles for Technology Literate Students:  Grade 1

I.  Creativity and Innovation
A. Expose to drawing tools.
Tuxpaint
Label an existing map or template

II.  Communication and Collaboration
A. Work cooperatively and collaboratively with peers, family members, and others when using technology.

III.  Research and Information Retrieval
A. Use developmentally appropriate multimedia resources (e.g., interactive books, websites, educational software, elementary multimedia encyclopedias) to support learning.
•Use teacher created Portaportal for web resources.

IV.  Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving and Decision-Making
A. Use primary-level websites to reinforce reading, math, problem solving and critical thinking skills.

V.  Digital Citizenship
A. Demonstrate respect for the computer work of others.
B. Why is technology important in our world? How do you see it being used?

VI.  Technology Operations and Concepts
A. Communicate about technology using the following developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology:   keyboard, mouse, computer, printer, click, screen, dock, cursor, arrow, touchpad/trackpad, print, headset, bookmark, and browser.
B. Demonstrate respect for and correct use of computer equipment (pressing keys gently, no eating/drinking).
C. Printing by permission only.
D. Understand the importance of cleanliness around the computer.
E. Demonstrate appropriate conduct during computer work periods.Use a mouse.
Type the alphabet.
F. Use a pull down menu.
G. Open and quit a program.
H. Locate and properly use the space bar, shift key, return key, delete key, and period.
•Practice writing name and spelling words.
•Keyboarding Program such as Type to Learn Jr. or other web-based programs
•Type a math sentence or line from a story.
•Type 1-2 sentences and one’s name, using the shift key for capital letters.

VII. Online Assessment
A. NWEA: Explore as a group and practice individually the use of the NWEA interactive demo site.

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Profiles for Technology Literate Students:  Grade 2

I.  Creativity and Innovation
A. Introduce drawing tools: text tool, line tool, shape tools, color fill.
•Tuxpaint

II.  Communication and Collaboration
A. Work cooperatively and collaboratively with peers, family members, and others when using technology.

III.  Research and Information Retrieval
A.  Use developmentally appropriate multimedia resources (e.g., interactive books, websites, educational software, elementary multimedia encyclopedias) to support learning.
•Use teacher created Portaportal for web resources.

IV.  Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving and Decision-Making
A.  Use primary-level computer software applications and websites to reinforce reading, math, problem solving and critical thinking skills.
Compare and contrast programs.

V.  Digital Citizenship
A. Demonstrate respect for the computer work of others.
B. Describe how technology has an impact on how people live, communicate, and how they acquire goods and services.
Why is technology important in our world? How do you see it being used?
C. Make, post, and utilize computer rules.
D. Explain the functions of technology in the workplace.

VI.  Technology Operations and Concepts
A. Communicate about technology using the following developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology:  keyboard, mouse, computer, printer, click, screen, dock, cursor, arrow, touchpad/trackpad, print, headset, browser, spinning wheel, icon, selection tool, I-beam, insertion point, scroll, command Q, browser (Safari, Chrome, and Firefox), navigating a browser forward and back.
B. Demonstrate respect for and correct use of computer equipment (pressing keys gently, no eating/drinking). Printing by permission only.
Understand the importance of cleanliness around the computer.
C. Demonstrate appropriate conduct during computer work periods.
D. Use a mouse.
•Type math sentences, journals, stories, thank you notes, simple research.
E. Use a pull down menu.
F. Open and quit a program. Locate and properly use the space bar, shift key, return key, delete key, and period, and arrow keys.
•Practice writing name and spelling words.
•Keyboarding Program such as Type to Learn Jr. or other web-based programs
•Type a math sentence or line from a story.
G. Introduce the concept of home row, hand positioning and posture in keyboarding.
H. Recognize where alphabetic and numeric keys are on the keyboard.

VII. Online Assessment
A. NWEA: Explore as a group and practice individually the use of the NWEA interactive demo site.
B.  Practice use of calculator

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Profiles for Technology Literate Students:  Grade 3

I.  Creativity and Innovation
A. Understand drawing tools: text tool, line tool, shape tools, color fill.
•Tuxpaint and Pages
B. Add graphic to document

II.  Communication and Collaboration
A. Work cooperatively and collaboratively with peers, family members, and others when using technology.
B.  Introduction to Blogging (KVBA)

III.  Research and Information Retrieval
A. Use general purpose productivity tools and peripherals to support personal productivity, remediate skill deficits, and facilitate learning throughout the curriculum.
•Use teacher created Portaportal for web resources.
•Use a student folder shared on network.

IV.  Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving and Decision-Making
A. Use primary-level computer software applications and websites to reinforce reading, math, problem solving and critical thinking skills.
Read and interpret displays of data
Experiment with shapes and figures.
Solve and justify solutions to real life problems such as measurement of time, length, etc (Simple Machine website).

V.  Digital Citizenship
A. Demonstrate respect for the computer work of others. Access only own folder, own keyboard, and own work.
B. Describe how technology has an impact on how people live, communicate, and how they acquire goods and services.
C. Make, post, and utilize computer rules.
D. Explain the functions of technology in the workplace.
E. Learn about Internet safety, Cyberbullying, and personal responsibility.
•Netsmartz
F. Introduce the importance of copyright laws.
G. Learn about the Acceptable Use Policy. Read and discuss.

VI.  Technology Operations and Concepts
A. Communicate about technology using the following developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology: keyboard, mouse, computer, printer, click, screen, dock, cursor, arrow, touchpad/trackpad, print, headset, and CD drive, spinning wheel, icon, selection tool, I-beam, insertion point, scroll, browser (Safari, Chrome, and Firefox) scroll, click and drag, refresh, DVD, RAM, document, save, print, retrieve, edit, select, font, size, style, spell check, external storage devices, wireless router,  plagiarism, and column.
B. Demonstrate respect for and correct use of computer equipment (pressing keys gently, no eating/drinking).
C. Printing by permission only.  Identify printer (and location) prior to printing.
D. Understand the importance of cleanliness around the computer.
E. Demonstrate appropriate conduct during computer work periods.
F. Use a mouse/trackpad
•Type math sentences, journals, stories, thank you notes, simple research.
G. Use a pull down menu.
H. Open and quit a program. Use passwords.
I.  Locate and properly use the space bar, shift key, return key, delete key, and period, arrow keys, alphabetic keys, control, escape, command, tab, punctuation marks. Use the home row, proper hand positioning and touch-typing keyboarding.
•Finger Charts
•Type a short story.
J. Name, save, print, and retrieve a document.
K. Select by highlighting and edit text by changing the font, size, color, style of text and spacing. Introduce copy and paste.
Write size, style, font, and color on the board as direction prior to printing.
Use copy/paste command as a shortcut for example write a repetitive style poem, song or rap
L. Use tab key to indent a paragraph.
•Teacher will demonstrate writing of computer terminology and use tab key to indent each time.

VII. Online Assessment
A. NWEA: Explore as a group and practice individually the use of the NWEA interactive demo site.
B. Practice use of calculator

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Profiles for Technology Literate Students: Grade 4

I.  Creativity and Innovation
A. Understand drawing tools: text tool, line tool, shape tools, color fill.
•Create a polygon activity or symmetrical designs.
•Use Comic Life
B. Manipulate a graphic in terms of size and rotation and add to document.
C. Introduce Math Dictionary online

II.  Communication and Collaboration
A. Work cooperatively and collaboratively with peers, family members, and others when using technology.
B. Expose to digital images and multimedia presentations.
C. Discuss use of e-mail and text/instant messages.
D. Understand safe use of the Internet including Cyberbullying.
View the Netsmartz videos.

III.  Research and Information Retrieval
A. Use general-purpose productivity tools and peripherals to support personal productivity, and facilitate learning throughout the curriculum.
•Use teacher created Portaportal for web resources.
•Use a student website folder shared on network.
•Keyword searching
B. Discriminate and select information that is factual vs. advertising.
C. Use the World Wide Web to research topics for a report using bookmarked sites.
D. Evaluate the accuracy, relevance, appropriateness, comprehensiveness, and bias of electronic information sources.
E. Siting internet resources (collaborate with Librarians)

IV.  Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving and Decision-Making
A. Use primary-level computer software applications and websites to reinforce reading, math, problem solving and critical thinking skills.
B. Create simple tables and graphs based on the data.
Graphing student surveys and informational data (M&M, favorite sports, mail, how many boys and girls in each grade, etc.) using Pages or Create a Graph website
•Chart temperature and create organized lists.

V.  Digital Citizenship
A. Demonstrate respect for the computer work of others.
B. Identify ways that technology can change the lives of people.
C. Make, post, and utilize computer rules.
D. Explain the functions of technology in the workplace.
E. Use Internet safety, Cyberbullying, and personal responsibility.
•Netsmartz
F. Introduce the importance of copyright laws including online images.
G. Learn about the Acceptable Use Policy. Read and discuss.

VI.  Technology Operations and Concepts
A. Communicate about technology using the following developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology:  keyboard, mouse, computer, printer, click, screen, dock, cursor, arrow, touchpad/trackpad, print, headset, and CD drive, spinning wheel, icon, selection tool, I-beam, insertion point, scroll, browser (Safari, Chrome, and Firefox) scroll,click and drag, DVD, RAM, document, save, print, retrieve, edit, select, font, size, style, spell check, plagiarism, and column, row, cell, e-mail, online, logon, logout, password, download, browser, bookmark, homepage, import, menu, Net/Internet, URL(Universal Resource Locator), WWW (World wide web), internet extensions .org/.edu/.gov/.com.
B. Demonstrate respect for and correct use of computer equipment (pressing keys gently, no eating/drinking). Printing by permission only.
C. Understand the importance of cleanliness around the computer.
D. Demonstrate appropriate conduct during computer work periods.
E. Use a mouse/trackpad.
Type math sentences, journals, stories, thank you notes, research.
F. Use a pull down menu. Open and quit a program from dock.
G. Use various parts of a computer system (printer, keyboard, monitor/screen, mouse/trackpad).
H. Locate and properly use the space bar, shift key, return key, delete key, and period, arrow keys, alphabetic keys, control, escape, command, tab, punctuation marks. Use all alphabetic keys and demonstrate proper hand positioning and touch typing keyboarding.
•Teach keyboarding using resources such as text Elementary Keyboarding varied websites and applications such as Type to Learn, Dance Matt Typing
I. Name, saves, prints, and retrieves a document. Use shift key for capitalization. Center title, indent paragraph using tab key. use text wrap and text boxes and the use of the Inspector.
•Teacher creates a template for a lab or book report, and student completes.
•Create business cards or design your own icon.
J. Select by highlighting and edit text by changing the font, size, color, style of text and spacing. Use cut, copy and paste for text and images.
K.  Use of browsers, search engines, hypertext links, bookmarks,
L. Open and quit/exit an application, shutdown computer correctly.
M. Identify open programs in the dock.
N. Spell checks assignments and use thesaurus. Use proofreader in Pages.
O. Importing copyright free images.

VII. Online Assessment
A. NWEA: Explore as a group and practice individually the use of the NWEA interactive demo site.
B. Practice use of calculator

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Profiles for Technology Literate Students: Grade 5

I.  Creativity and Innovation
A. Understand drawing tools: text tool, line tool, shape tools, color fill.
•Create a polygon activity or symmetrical designs.
B. Manipulate a graphic in terms of size and rotation and add to document.
C. Exposure to desktop publishing.
•Keynote, Pages, Numbers
•brochures, business cards, presentations, reports
D. Create original computer art using a variety of paint tools.

II.  Communication and Collaboration
A. Work cooperatively and collaboratively with peers, family members, and others when using technology.
B. Expose to digital images and multimedia presentations.
C. Discuss use of e-mail and text/instant messages.
D. Understand safe use of the Internet and Cyberbullying.
•View the Netsmartz videos.

III.  Research and Information Retrieval
A. Use general-purpose productivity tools and peripherals to support personal productivity, and facilitate learning throughout the curriculum.
Use teacher created Portaportal for web resources.
Use a student website folder shared on network.
B. Discriminate and select information that is factual.
C. Use the Internet to research topics for a report using bookmarked sites.
D. Evaluate the accuracy, relevance, appropriateness, comprehensiveness, and bias of electronic information sources.
E. Siting internet resources (collaborate with Librarians)

IV.  Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving and Decision-Making
A. Use primary-level computer software applications and websites to reinforce reading, math, problem solving and critical thinking skills.
B. Create simple spreadsheets and graphs based on the data.
Graphing student surveys and informational data (M&M, favorite sports, mail, how many boys and girls in each grade, etc.)
C. Create line/bar graphs, pie charts, and scattergrams and distinguish between the data appropriate to each.
•Stock market project
•Coding Applications for kids (Scratch, Code.org)

V.  Digital Citizenship
A. Demonstrate respect for the computer work of others.
B. Identify ways that technology can change the lives of people.
C. Importance of not including personal information on the internet (name, photos, etc)
D. Explain the functions of technology in the workplace.
E. Use Internet safety, Cyberbullying, and personal responsibility.
Netsmartz
F. Introduce the importance of copyright laws. Define software piracy and plagiarism.
G. Learn about the Acceptable Use Policy. Read and discuss.
•Become familiar with the sending and receiving of electronic mail.
•Compose e-mail for educational purposes (state rep, agencies).
•Teacher demonstrates use of e-mail.
H. Discuss issues of taking photos of other people.

VI.  Technology Operations and Concepts
A. Communicate about technology using the following developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology: keyboard, mouse, computer, printer, click, screen, dock, cursor, arrow, and CD drive, spinning wheel, icon, selection tool, I-beam, insertion point, scroll, click and drag, DVD, document, save, print, retrieve, edit, select, font, size, style, touchpad/trackpad, print, headset, browser (Safari, Internet Explorer, and Firefox), spell check, plagiarism, column, row, cell, e-mail, online, logon, logout, password, download, browser, bookmark, homepage, import, menu, Net/Internet, URL(Universal Resource Locator) WWW (World wide web), address bar, refresh, dialog box.
B. Demonstrate respect for and correct use of computer equipment (pressing keys gently, no eating/drinking). Printing by permission only.
C. Demonstrate appropriate conduct during computer work periods.
D. Use a pull down menu. Open and quit a program.
E. Locate and properly use the space bar, shift key, return key, delete key, and period, arrow keys, alphabetic keys, control, escape, command, tab, punctuation marks. Use all alphabetic keys and demonstrate proper hand positioning and touch typing keyboarding.
•Teach keyboarding using resources such as text Elementary Keyboarding varied websites and applications such as Type to Learn, Dance Matt Typing
F. Name saves, print, and retrieve a document. Use shift key for capitalization. Center title, indent paragraph using tab key. Use text wrap and text boxes.
G. Select by highlighting and edit text by changing the font, size, color, style of text and spacing. Use cut, copy and paste. Change page orientation.
H. Use local area network to access information electronically.
I. Use of browsers, search engines, hypertext links, bookmarks,
J. Open and quit/exit an application, shutdown computer correctly.
K. Identify open programs in the dock.
L. Spell checks assignments and use thesaurus and proofreader.
M. Locate files or programs by using the Find command.

VII. Online Assessment
A. NWEA: Explore as a group and practice individually the use of the NWEA interactive demo site.
B. Practice use of calculator

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Profiles for Technology Literate Students:  Grade 6-8

I.  Creativity and Innovation
A. Understand drawing tools: text tool, line tool, shape tools, color fill.
B. Design, develop, publish, and present products (e.g., Web pages, videos) using technology resources that demonstrate and communicate curriculum concepts to audiences inside and outside the classroom.
C. Exposure to desktop publishing.
1. Keynote, Appleworks, Pages
D. Exposure to technology peripherals: such as graphing calculators, projector, hand held computers, digital microscope, speakers, digital camcorder, digital camera, interactive whiteboards, lego robotics, environmental probes.

II.  Communication and Collaboration
A. Collaborate with peers, experts, and others using telecommunications and collaborative tools to investigate curriculum-related problems, issues, and information, and to develop solutions or products for audiences inside and outside the classroom. (Collaborate using Google Apps sharing of documents and presentations)
B. Expose to digital images and multimedia presentations–Proper use of audio, elements of design, professional format, Understanding intended audience
C. Understand the function and types of electronic communication:  internet, informational databases, email, instant message, chat, podcast, blog, GPS.
D. Understand safe use of the internet.
1. View the Netsmartz videos.

III.  Research and Information Retrieval
A.  Research and evaluate the accuracy, relevance, appropriateness, comprehensiveness, and bias of electronic information sources concerning real-world problems.
1. Use internet bookmark keepers like Portaportal or a related site.
2. Use the Marvel library databases in research.
B. Discriminate and select information that is factual and discuss pros & cons of sites like Wikipedia.
C. Understand the significance of dated vs. current material.
D. Evaluate the accuracy, relevance, appropriateness, comprehensiveness, and bias of electronic information sources.
E. Successfully locate information in electronic resources by using search tools such as key words, filters, quotation marks.

IV.  Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving and Decision-Making
A. Apply productivity/multimedia tools and peripherals to support personal productivity, group collaboration, and learning throughout the curriculum.
1. Select and use appropriate tools and technology resources to accomplish a variety of tasks and solve problems. (Choose from the Google Apps suite of programs)

V.  Digital Citizenship
A. Demonstrate respect for the computer work of others.
B. Demonstrate knowledge of current changes in information technologies and the effect those changes have on the workplace and society.
C. Make, post, and utilize computer rules.
D. Exhibit legal and ethical behaviors when using information and technology, and discuss consequences of misuse.
E. Use internet safety and personal responsibility. Discuss Texting, Instant Messaging, Chatting, Email and Social Networking sites (such as Facebook, MySpace and YouTube). posting personal information, creating & protecting passwords, reviewing Buddy Lists, downloading music, Cyberbullying, inappropriate uses of cell phone cameras.
1. Netsmartz
F. Introduce the importance of copyright laws. Define software piracy and plagiarism.
G. Read and discuss the Acceptable Use Policy.
H. Become familiar with the sending and receiving of electronic mail.
1. Compose e-mail for educational purposes (state rep, agencies).
2. Teacher demonstrates use of e-mail.
3. Students use Google Gmail

VI.  Technology Operations and Concepts
A. Communicate about technology using the following developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology: click, screen, dock, cursor, arrow, and CD drive, spinning wheel, icon, selection tool, I-beam, insertion point, scroll, click and drag, DVD, RAM, CPU, document, save, print, retrieve, edit, select, font, size, style, column, row, cell, e-mail, online, logon, logout, password, download, browser, bookmark, homepage, HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), import, menu, Net/Internet, URL(Universal Resource Locator) WWW (World wide web), thumb/pen drives, highlight, USB port, firewire port, wireless airport, network, dongle, track pad, scanner, digital camera, digital camcorder, server, sleep, charging, preferences.
B. Demonstrate respect for and correct use of computer equipment (pressing keys gently, no eating/drinking). Apply strategies for identifying and solving routine hardware and software problems that occur during everyday use.
C. Demonstrate appropriate conduct during computer work periods.
D. Use a pull down menu. Open and quit a program.
E. Locate and properly use the space bar, shift key, return key, delete key, and period, arrow keys, alphabetic keys, control, escape, command, tab, punctuation marks. Use all alphabetic keys and demonstrate proper hand positioning and touch typing keyboarding, minimize and maximize windows.
F. Name, save, print, and retrieve a document. Use shift key for capitalization. Center title, indent paragraph using tab key. Use text wrap and text boxes.
G. Select by highlighting and edit text by changing the font, size, color, style of text and spacing. Use cut, copy and paste. Change page orientation.
H. Use local area network to access information electronically.
I. Use of browsers, search engines, hypertext links, bookmarks.
J. Become familiar with Database as a tool
1. How are databases used in society?
2. Discuss PowerSchool as a relationship database.
3. Explore Marvel and other library databases.
K. Identify open programs in the dock. Able to differentiate between various productivity tools: spreadsheets, databases, word processing, tables & graphs.
L. Spell check assignments and use thesaurus and dictionary.
M. Locate files or programs by using the Find command.
N. Use proper file management techniques such as, saving to the server for backup, Create a new folder to organize saved work, delete old files from shared drive personal folders.

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Profiles for Technology Literate Students:  Grades 9-12

I.  Creativity and Innovation:
Students think creatively, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products using technology.
A. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas and products.
B. Use technology for creative self-expression.
1. Provide opportunities in core subject areas for students to produce brochures, slideshows, or other multimedia presentations using various software applications to demonstrate skills and knowledge.
2. Business Principles and Management use electronic projects like the stock market and eBay for group problem solving and simulations.
C. Identify trends and forecast possibilities.
1. Integrate and use spreadsheets, charts, and graphs.
2. Use of ATM system for collaboration with other schools for guest speakers and seminars.

II.  Communication and Collaboration:
Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
A. Collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and others employing a variety of digital media and formats.
B. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences utilizing a variety of media and formats.
C. Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
1. Integrate multimedia strategies to enhance curriculum.
2. Resources:  Blogs, Moodle, e-mail, Portaportal, class web pages, web portfolios, ATM, Virtual field trips, Cable TV, E-pals, webcams, Virtual High School, PLATO.
3. French class uses RealFrench.net for local news in French.
4. German class uses electronic connections during classes.
D. Contribute to project teams to produce original works.
1. Opportunities to create original works as a team.
2. Resources:  Lego Robotics, creating a yearbook, create class/group slideshows, senior projects i.e. senior slideshow, videos produced for competitions.

III. Research and Information Retrieval:
Students access, retrieve, manage, and evaluate information using digital tools.
A. Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and use information from a variety of sources and media.
1. Utilize Marvel and other library databases during research.
B. Evaluate and select information sources and technological tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks.
1. Require students to obtain appropriate and relevant information via digital sources.
2. Resources:  Media Specialist, classroom teachers
C. Process data and report results.
Producing term papers or reports which include appropriate citation.
1. Consumer Economics does online research for consumer related topics.

IV.  Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving and Decision-Making:
Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems and make informed decisions using appropriate technology tools.
A. Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and make informed decisions.
1. Science data collection and interpretation
B. Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.
1. Use computer models or other applications to demonstrate cause and effects.

V.  Digital Citizenship:
Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.
A. Advocate and practice safe, responsible use of information and technology.
B. Continue to teach about Internet Safety, CyberBullying.
C. Exhibit positive attitudes toward technology uses that support collaboration, learning, and productivity.

VI.  Technology Operations and Concepts:
Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
A. Understand and use technology systems.
B. Identify and use applications effectively and productively.
C. Troubleshoot systems and applications.
D. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies.
1. Provide training to students to use high school network system including accessing system, storing data, printing, and security.
2. Resources:  Computer lab teachers and technicians, Network Administrator, Integration Specialist, and classroom teachers.

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Technology Glossary
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A
acceptable use policy      This is a policy set up by the network administrator or other school leaders in conjunction with their technology needs and safety concerns. This policy restricts the manner in which a network may be used, and helps provide guidelines for teachers using technology in the classroom.

alias    A file that points to another item, such as a program, document, folder, or disk. When an alias is opened, the original item that the alias points to is opened. This helps in the organizing and accessing of files. Alias is purely a Mac term. The equivalent term for Windows-based computers is a shortcut.

application     A software program that lets you complete a task, such as writing a paper, creating a poster, designing an image, or viewing a Web page.

Appleworks      State Approval Letter    Software application for word processing, database, spreadsheets, slideshows. Works on an Apple computer.

arrow   A pre-defined cursor (actually a cursor handle) in the shape of an arrow.

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B
backup    Additional resources or duplicate copies of data on different storage media for emergency purposes.

bandwidth      The amount of information that one can send through a connection, measures in bits-per-second (Bps). A standard page of English text contains about 16,000 bits.

blog   A website where entries are made in journal style and displayed in a reverse chronological order.

bit      Binary DigIT. A single digit number in base-2 (either a one or a zero). This is the smallest unit of computerized data.

bookmark    A stored location for quick retrieval at a later date. Web browsers provide bookmarks that contain the addresses (URLs) of favorite sites.

browser      The software  application that allows you to view Internet pages.

BTW      An acronym often used in e-mail messages and chat sessions to mean: “by the way.”

Buddy List is a trademarked term of AOL, referring to the list of frequent contacts used in connection with AOL’s Internet software and its AOL Instant Messenger program.

byte      A set of 8 bits that means something to the computer, like a letter, number, or punctuation mark. For example, the byte 01001000 signifies the character H. The three-letter word hat requires 3 bytes.

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C
camcorder A combination video camera and videocassette recorder in one unit. that record and play back using videotape cassettes or DVDs (DVD-R or DVD-RAM).

CD-ROM  (Compact Disc Read Only Memory) A compact disc format used to hold text, graphics and hi-fidelity stereo sound.

CD drive        A player or reader that is usually internal on the computer that reads CD-ROM format.

cell    In a spreadsheet, the intersection of a row and column.

cell phone  A mobile or cellular telephone is a long-range, portable electronic device for personal telecommunications over long distances.

client/server      A term denoting the technology relationship between two types of computers, the client (normally your Mac or PC) and the server (a computer that stores and delivers information or files to you). When surfing the Internet, you are the client, and the pages you are reading come from the server, such as the www4teachers server.

chart  A type of information graphic that represents tabular numeric data and/or functions.

click   An instance of pressing down and releasing a button on a pointing device, such as a mouse.

column   A vertical set of data or components.

computer        the mechanical, magnetic, electronic, and electrical components making up a computer system.

control key (CTRL)     A key used to access commands through the keyboard rather than the menus. CTRL commands are commonly shortcuts.

control panel     A window you can open to adjust various aspects of your computer, such as the volume, fonts, desktop background, mouse speed, and clock.

copyright   The legal ownership of a “work,” which can take any of the following forms: written text, program source code, graphics images, sculpture, music, sound recording, motion picture, pantomime, choreograph and architecture.

CPU      Central Processing Unit. The CPU is the hardware that most people consider the “brain” of the computer. It takes instructions from software, makes calculations, and helps run the show!

cursor  The symbol used to point to some element on screen.

Cyber bullying (cyber-bullying, online bullying) is the use of electronic information and communication devices such as e-mail, instant messaging, text messages, blogs, mobile phones, pagers, and defamatory websites to bully or otherwise harass an individual or group through personal attacks or other means, and it may constitute a computer crime.

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D
database A set of related files that is created and managed by a database management system that can manage any form of data including text, images, sound and video

desktop      The background behind all your windows, menus, and dialog boxes: your virtual desk. You can change the look of your desktop by applying different properties to it through your control panel.

delete   b   A way of removing a file from a computer’s file system.

digital         Traditionally, digital means the use of numbers and the term comes from digit, or finger. Today, digital is synonymous with computer in that the data is found on the computer.

dock    Bar of icons that sits at the bottom of the screen of an Apple computer. It provides easy access to some of the applications

document   From the computer perspective, the term initially only referred to a word processing file.

domain name      b      The unique address name for an Internet site. The part on the left is the most specific, and the part on the right is the most general.

dongle    The term was originally slang for a “hardware key.” Today, the term is often used to refer to any small adapter that has a short cable with connectors at both ends.

download      To save a file onto your computer from another source, like the Internet. People often download files, such as free-ware, share-ware, for installations, and sounds, movie clips, text files, or news streams onto their computer for viewing or listening.

drag    To move an object on screen such that its complete movement is visible from starting location to destination. The movement may be activated with a stylus, mouse or keyboard keys.

DVD   (Digital VideoDisc or Digital Versatile Disc) An optical digital disc for storing movies and data

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E
edit  To make a change to existing data.

e-mail   (Electronic-MAIL) The transmission of text messages and optional file attachments over a network.

escape   When sent by the user, escape is often used to abort execution or data entry. When sent by the computer it often starts an escape sequence.

Ethernet      A common method of networking computers in a Local Area Network (LAN).

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F
find    The find program is a search utility

Finder      The Finder is the default open application on a Macintosh, and it’s represented by a little, purple, happy face icon in the top right-hand corner of the screen. Most people think of it as the desktop, however, or as the utility that lets you navigate quickly among open programs. When you click on the Finder, you can designate which of your open applications will be the active one.

firewall      Hardware and/or software that separates a Local Area Network  (LAN) into two or more parts for security purposes.

firewire        A proprietary name of Apple Computer for the IEEE 1394 interface.  It is a personal computer (and digital audio/digital video) serial bus interface standard, offering high-speed communications and isochronous real-time data services. FireWire has replaced Parallel SCSI in many applications due to lower implementation costs and a simplified, more adaptable cabling system.

folder   In a graphical user interface (GUI), a simulated file folder that holds data, applications and other folders.

font    A set of type characters of a particular typeface design and size.

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G
GIF      Graphics Interchange Format. An efficient method of storing graphics developed for CompuServe in the early 1980s. GIF files take up a small amount of disk space and can be transmitted quickly over phone lines. GIFs can be viewed on any computer platform and are best for illustrations, cartoons, logos, or similar non-photographic graphics.

Google Earth   Google Earth combines the power of Google Search with satellite imagery,  maps, terrain and 3D buildings to put the world’s geographic information  at your fingertips. Visit earth.google.com for more info and to download.

Global Positioning System, usually called GPS, is a satellite navigation system. More than two dozen GPS satellites orbit the Earth and transmit radio signals which allow any GPS receiver near the planet to determine its location, speed and direction.

graph   a type of information graphics like a chart.

GUI  (Graphical User Interface) A graphics-based user interface that incorporates movable windows, icons and a mouse. The ability to resize application windows and change style and size of fonts are the significant advantages of a GUI vs. a character-based interface. GUIs have become the standard way users interact with a computer, and the major GUIs are the Windows and Mac interfaces.

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H
hand held computer   A pocket-sized computing device, typically utilising a small visual display screen for user output and a miniaturised keyboard for user input.

hard drive      A device for storing information in a fixed location within your computer. The equivalent of a filing cabinet in an office, the hard drive is used for storing programs and documents that are not being used.

hardware   Machinery and equipment (CPU, disks, tapes, modem, cables, etc.). In operation, a computer is both hardware and software.
highlight   To select an icon or group of icons or some part of a text document or image in order to perform an operation on it, such as moving it, deleting it or copying it.

homepage      The page on the Internet which most often gives users access to the rest of the Web site. A site is a collection of pages.

HTML      Hypertext Markup Language. This is the coding language used to create sites on the World Wide Web.

hypertext      Generally any text in a file that contains words, phrases, or graphics that, when clicked, cause another document to be retrieved and displayed. Hypertext most often appears blue and underlined in Web pages.

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I
I-beam     I-beam may also refer to the text cursor of a graphical computer user interface.

icon    Symbols or illustrations on the desktop or computer screen that indicate program files, documents, or other functions.

iMovie   Software application used to make movies on an Apple computer.

import   To read a file in a format that is not native to the application in use. Mainstream applications typically import (and export) a variety of popular formats.

insertion point     the point where input is inserted.

Instant messaging or IM is a form of real-time communication between two or more people based on typed text.

Internet   The largest network in the world. It is made up of more than 100 million computers in more than 100 countries covering commercial, academic and government endeavors. Originally developed for the U.S. military, the Internet became widely used for academic and commercial research

IP Number      Internet Protocol number. A unique number consisting of four parts separated by dots, for example 129.237.247.243. This is the number assigned to a host machine which is retrieved by a DNS when a request for an Internet site is made. These numbers usually correspond to unique domain names, which are easier for people to remember.
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J
JPG or JPEG      An efficient method for storing graphic files for transmission across phone lines. Unlike GIF files, JPG files lose a little data when the image is converted, and their files are often much larger than GIFs. However, JPGs are your best choice for photographic images.

K
keyboard         1.  A set of keys, as on a computer terminal, word processor, typewriter, or piano. 2. To enter (text or data) into a computer by means of a keyboard.

Keynote    Software application used to create multimedia presentations.

kilobyte (KB)      A thousand bytes. Due to the binary nature of computers, it’s 210 bytes, technically 1024 bytes.

KidPix  Software application for drawing and creativity

L
link     An address that points to a Web page or other file (image, video, PDF, etc.) on a Web server. Links reside on Web pages, in e-mail messages and word processing documents as well as any other document type that supports hypertext and URL addressing.

Local Area Network  LAN     A computer network limited to the immediate area, usually the same building.

Logoff     The process of quitting from, or signing off of, a computer system.

Logon    The process of gaining access, or signing in, to a computer system.
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M
mailing list      A system that allows people to send e-mail to one address, which is then copied and sent to all of the other subscribers to the mail list. In this way, people who may be using different kinds of e-mail access can participate in discussions together.

MARVEL   Thousands of magazines, newspapers, and reference books  are available anywhere in the State of Maine through the online resources of MARVEL!  Maine’s Virtual Library, a service of Maine InfoNet. Visit at   http://libraries.maine.edu/mainedatabases/

maximize    In a graphical environment, to enlarge a window to the full size of the screen…opposite of minimize.

menu bar      A horizontal strip at the top of a window that shows the menus available in a program.

minimize    In a graphical environment, to hide an application that is currently displayed on screen. The window is removed and represented with an icon on the desktop or taskbar…opposite of maximize.

monitor A device that accepts video signals from a computer and displays information on a screen; a video display.

motherboard      A computer’s main circuit board, containing the CPU, microprocessor support chips, RAM, and expansion (bus) slots. Also known as the logic board.

mouse   A hand-held, button-activated input device that when rolled along a flat surface directs an indicator to move correspondingly about a computer screen, allowing the operator to move the indicator freely, as to select operations or manipulate text or graphics.

multimedia      Information in more than one form. It includes the use of text, audio, graphics, animation and full-motion video.

myspace     MySpace is also a social networking website that began as a home to various musicians, filmmakers, celebrities, and comedians who upload songs, short films, and other work directly onto their profile. Today it is used by millions of people to post information about their interests, education, and much more. Visit myspace.com to learn more.

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N
network       A group of connected computers that allows people to share information and equipment. Many schools have a Local Area Network and are also connected to a Wide Area Network, such as the World Wide Web.

Netsmartz               Website that teaches students, parents, law enforcement, and teachers about safety on the internet. Visit www.netsmartz.org

O
operating system (OS)      This is the programming that makes your computer run its most basic functions. Some examples are Windows XP or Vista or Mac OSX

online    Available for immediate use. It typically refers to being connected to the Internet or other remote service.

P
Pages    Software application used for creating documents that are highly formated.

page orientation   The way in which a rectangular page is oriented for normal viewing. The two most common types of orientation are portrait and landscape.

password    A secret word or code used to serve as a security measure against unauthorized access to data.

personal computer (PC)      A microcomputer with its own processor and hard drive. Although technically this refers to all such computers, including Macs, the term PC is nearly synonymous with only the IBM-compatible microcomputers running the Windows operating system.

piracy   Software piracy is the copyright infringement of software refers to several practices when done without the permission of the copyright holder:

Plagiarism  The practice of “dishonestly” claiming or implying original authorship of material which one has not actually created, such as when a person incorporates material from someone else’s work into their own work without attributing it.

plug-in      A small piece of software that adds features to already existing, usually large, programs.

podcast     A podcast is a multimedia file that is distributed by subscription (paid or unpaid) over the Internet using syndication feeds, for playback on mobile devices and personal computers. The host or author of a podcast is often called a podcaster.

Portaportal     A web based bookmarking utility that lets you store links to your favorite websites online.

printer an output device that prints the results of data processing.

pulldown menu      A list of options that “pulls down” when you select a menu at the top of a window. For example, the File menu in most programs is a pulldown menu that reveals commands such as open, new, and save.
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Q

R
RAM      Random Access Memory. Readable and writeable memory that acts as a storage area while the computer is on, and is erased every time the computer is turned off. This memory stores data and helps execute programs while in use.

retrieve  To call up data that has been stored in a computer system.

ROM      Read Only Memory. Readable memory that cannot be corrupted by accidental erasure. ROM retains its data when the computer is turned off.

row  A horizontal set of data or components.

S
save    To copy the document, record or image being worked on onto a storage medium.

scanner     A device that reads a printed page or transparency and converts it into a graphics image for the computer.

screen  The display area of a computer monitor or TV set.

scroll     To continuously move forward, backward or sideways through the text and images on screen or within a window.

search engine      Any of a number of giant databases on the Internet which store data on Web sites and their corresponding URLs. Some popular search engines are Google,  Yahoo, and Excite.

select   To highlight or click on an icon or text.

server      A computer or software package that provides a specific service to client software running on other computers. The term can refer to a particular piece of software, such as a WWW server, or to the machine on which the software is running, hence the popular phrase: “The server’s down.”

shortcuts      Key strokes that enact the same commands available in the menus of a program. They are quicker and more direct, and usually involve two or three keys depressed simultaneously. An example is the save shortcut: CTRL + s on a PC or Open Apple +s on a Mac.

sleep   The inactive status of a terminal, device or program that is awakened by sending a code to it.

social networks    Social networking also refers to a category of Internet applications to help connect friends, business partners, or other individuals together using a variety of tools. These applications, known as online social networks are becoming increasingly popular. Myspace is the most common social network.

software   Esnable a computer to perform specific tasks, as opposed to the physical components of the system (hardware). This includes application software such as a word processor, which enables a user to perform a task, and system software such as an operating system, which enables other software to run properly, by interfacing with hardware and with other software or custom software made to user specifications.

spellcheck     A separate program or word processing function that tests for correctly spelled words

spinning wheel      The spinning wait cursor (also known as the rainbow wheel of death) is a cursor in Apple’s Mac OS X used to indicate that an application is unresponsive.

spreadsheet   Software that simulates a paper spreadsheet (worksheet), in which columns of numbers are summed for budgets and plans. It appears on screen as a matrix of rows and columns, the intersections of which are called “cells.” The cells are filled with (1) labels, (2) numeric values or (3) formulas.

style    A typeface variation (normal, bold, italic, bold italic) of the font.
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T
T-1      One of the fastest leased-line connections used for the Internet. It is capable of transmitting data at roughly 1.5 million bits per second, still not fast enough for full-screen, full-motion video.

TCP/IP      Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. The programming protocols invented by individuals in the U.S. Department of Defense to carry messages around the Internet.

technology      The application of scientific discoveries to the development and improvement of goods and services that ideally improve the life of humans and their environment. Such goods and services include materials, machinery, and processes that improve production or solve problems. In schools, technology ranges from pencils, books, and furniture to lighting, transportation, computers, and more. Most common references in schools imply computing or computer-related programs.

Telecommunication is the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication.

thumb drive    USB thumb or flash drives are flash memory data storage devices integrated with a USB interface. They are typically small, lightweight, removable and rewritable.

touchpad  An input device commonly used in laptop computers. They are used to move the cursor, using motions of the user’s finger. They are a substitute for a computer mouse.

Type to Learn   Software application used to teach Keyboarding skills.
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U
USB  (Universal Serial Bus) A widely used hardware interface for attaching peripheral devices.

UNIX      A multi-user operating system that was used to create most of the programs and protocols that built the Internet.

URL      Uniform Resource Locators. This is the address of any given site on the Internet. The URL of this site is: http://www.4teachers.org/glossary/index.shtml

UltraKey   Software application for teaching keyboarding.
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V
VGA      Virtual Graphics Array. This standard video graphics adapter was created by IBM and has been since improved in Super VGA, which generally supports “true color” or 16.8 million colors.

virtual   With regard to memory, virtual refers to temporarily storing information on the hard drive. Virtual memory is controlled automatically by the operating system.

W
WAIS      Wide Area Information Server. A software system intended to search large database servers on the Web, and then rank the findings or hits.

WAN      Wide Area Network. This network connects several computer so they can share files and sometimes equipment, as well as exchange e-mail. A wide area network connects computers across a large geographic area, such as a city, state, or country. The World Wide Web is a WAN.

Wikipedia      The biggest multilingual free-content encyclopedia on the Internet. Over two million articles and still growing. Visit at www.wikipedia.org/

word processor       The software used to produce documents, such as letters, posters, reports, and syllabi. Common word processors used in schools are MS Works, MS Word, or ClarisWorks.

WWW   (World Wide Web) The “www-dot” prefix on Web addresses is placed in front of the domain name in order to provide a recognizable address for the world at large. Computers read Web addresses (URLs) from right to left, so that the WWW is the last component of the address. However, the WWW is quite often optional. Try typing in the name of your favorite Web site without the “www-dot” prefix and you might find it works just as well.

WYSIWYG       What You See Is What You Get. Monitor output that closely resembles the printed output. Most software now offers WYSIWYG options, like “print preview.”
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X

Y
youtube    Founded in February 2005 by three employees of PayPal, the San Bruno-based service utilizes Adobe Flash technology to display video. The wide variety of site content includes movie and TV clips and music videos, as well as amateur content such as videoblogging.

Z
zipped files      Zipped files are files that are compressed and must be “unzipped” to be read. Zipped files download faster because they are smaller than an uncompressed equivalent.

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